Nominations Open for Seventh Annual Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Award

March 12th 2019, 10:17am

The Center for Alcohol Policy is now accepting nominations for the Seventh Annual Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Award to be presented at the Center’s 12th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference, August 25 – 27 at the Boston Marriott Copley Place in Boston, Mass.

The award recognizes the work of alcohol regulators who oversee the alcohol industry and promote public safety. Any governmental agency or its employees working to promote and enforce alcohol laws and regulations are eligible for the award. A specific program that has achieved positive results or an individual within an agency going above and beyond the call of duty are examples of potential nominees.

Nominations should provide information on how the nominee serves as an example to others in alcohol regulation. Consideration will be given to how the actions of this nominee are helpful to other agencies or employees, achieve desired results and engage or impact a broad coalition of stakeholders. Self-nominations are permitted, and letters of support are encouraged.

HOW TO NOMINATE:

DEADLINE: The deadline for nominations is June 17, 2019, 5:30 p.m. EDT. Nominations postmarked/emailed after this deadline will not be considered.

AWARD: The Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Award recipient will be honored during the Center’s 12th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference in Boston, Mass. The award recipient also may be eligible to receive complimentary registration and a speaking opportunity at a future Alcohol Law and Policy Conference

For more information, please call (703) 519-3090 or email info@centerforalcoholpolicy.org.

North Carolina Alcohol Policy Forum Examines State-Based Alcohol Regulation, Public Health and Safety

March 4th 2019, 3:28pm

DURHAM, NC – On Monday, Feb. 25 The Center for Alcohol Policy and the North Carolina Beer and Wine Wholesalers Association co-hosted one of the Center’s state alcohol policy forums, which enjoyed the attendance of over 50 state policymakers, legislative staff, alcohol regulators, several public health representatives, and industry members.

The forum was kicked off by the National Beer Wholesalers Association’s Chief Economist Lester Jones, who provided the audience with an evaluation of the current role that the industry plays in the U.S. economy and industry trends that are taking hold.

The second session included a panel that delved into the public health benefits that stem from proper and effective alcohol regulation. Pam Erickson, former Executive Director of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission and CEO of Public Action Management, delivered a brief history of why alcohol has been and should be regulated the way it is, pointing out that “we cannot sell alcohol like we do tires and mayonnaise.” Citing a United Kingdom case study, Erickson described how that country’s “alcohol-related problems became epidemic” after deregulation, and “once you de-regulate, it is almost impossible to go back.”

Following Erickson, Dylan Ellerbee, Chair of the North Carolina Alcohol Policy Alliance, dove deeper into the public health and safety aspects of alcohol control. Ellerbee touched on the current “public health crisis” that stems from alcohol abuse, provided recommendations on how to curtail the high consumption of alcohol, then expounded on North Carolina’s control system, in which liquor retail stores are government-owned.

“Revenue generated per capita is around $30, while for non-control states it’s around $14.” He continued that “North Carolina is 44th of all states in consumption rates and 7th in revenue generated.” Ellerbee concludes that there would be negative repercussions if the state were to do away with its current system.

The forum’s final session highlighted the legal relevance of alcohol regulation and the differences between control system states and license system states. Brannon Denning, a Center Advisor and law professor at Samford University’s Cumberland School of Law, primarily focused on the significance of Toward Liquor Control right after prohibition and still today, given that it has “provided a road map on temperance, separation of the tiers, licensing and much more.”

Denning additionally updated attendees on recent court cases that are challenging the current system, such as Tennessee Wine and Spirits Retailers Association v. Thomas.

Closing the day, Neal Insley, Senior VP and General Counsel at the National Alcohol Beverage Control Association (NABCA), offered a comprehensive look at “control states” versus “license states.” Insley maintains that while both systems involve shared principles that help curtail problems to keep an orderly alcohol market, “control states tend to have much more control over issues such as pricing and receive more accountability from the state.”

When regulating, Insley emphasizes, “we need to acknowledge that alcohol is not an ordinary product, recognize the important role of science in informing and enforcing regulation, and find a balance between public safety and commercial interests.”

The Center for Alcohol Policy regularly hosts conferences that bring together a wide range of experts in the field of alcohol law. The Center will host its 12th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference August 25-27, 2019 in Boston, Mass. Each year, the event includes attorneys, alcohol regulators, academic leaders, public health advocates and other experts who discuss and debate current alcohol laws and challenges.

Essay on State-Level Alcohol Licensing Wins First Place in Center for Alcohol Policy’s 11th Annual Essay Contest

February 11th 2019, 9:43am

Alexandria, Va. – The Center for Alcohol Policy is pleased to announce that Nathaniel E. Moyer, an associate attorney at Harrison & Moberly, LLP in Indianapolis, has been named the winner of the Center’s 11th Annual Essay Contest. The national essay contest is intended to foster debate, analysis and examination of alcohol policy.

To enter the contest, participants were asked to provide thoughtful responses to the following prompt:

The licensing of individuals and businesses that are involved in the commerce of alcoholic beverages is an important feature of state-based alcohol regulation. Why is licensing necessary for an orderly marketplace, what impact does it have on public health and safety and what are the benefits provided by licensing systems?

“This year’s essay contest gave participants the opportunity to remind us of the importance of strong licensing regulations on those engaged in the commerce of alcohol,” stated Brannon Denning, Center advisor and associate dean and law professor at Samford University Cumberland School of Law, “the winning essays all highlight the public health and safety benefits of this important enforcement tool.”

Moyer’s winning essay, “Drink Local, Think Regional: Implementing an Orderly Alcohol Marketplace Through State-Level Licensing,” argues that the modern licensing system has proven its legitimacy and capacity through accomplishing “the goal of curbing alcohol’s worst excesses while concurrently promoting safe and responsible consumption.” His paper details the harmful impacts of alcohol use, illustrates previous alcohol policy initiatives in America and their effects, describes lessons learned from those policy agendas, and finally dives into the licensing system that exists today and its benefits to the public.

Moyer concludes that the “local regulatory framework model embraced by the 21st Amendment… has proven both durable and sustainable… The clear benefits of the current system should not be lightly disregarded, and wise policymakers will seek to preserve it.

Timothy Gervais, a Staff Tax Accountant at Tidwell & Associates in Rocklin, CA, was awarded second place with his essay, “Benefits of Alcohol Licensing: A Brief Discussion.” Gervais explained how the current “three-tiered licensing system of producers, distributors, and retailers provides a regulatory framework intended to: 1) provide safe alcohol to the consumer, 2) ensure that tax revenue from the sale of alcohol is returned to the state, and 3) discourage public over-consumption while mitigating the negative health and social effects of excessive alcohol intake,” but that meaningful regulation lies in implementation.

Shannon Auvil, a law clerk in Georgia, was awarded third place for her essay, “Creating Order for a Disorderly Product.” Her essay legitimizes the foundation for how alcohol is regulated today, expressing how “most effective public safety efforts are multi-faceted – they consider new technology, various audiences, education outreach, and creative ways to engage the public and make our communities stronger,” all the while being guided by those decades-old principals of an orderly marketplace.

The winning entrants received prizes of $5,000, $2,500 and $1,000 respectively.

 

Photo Downloads:

Nathaniel Moyer – First Place

Timothy Gervais– Second Place

Shannon Auvil– Third Place

 

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501 c(3) organization whose mission is to educate policy makers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

Virginia Alcohol Regulator Receives National Award at Center for Alcohol Policy Annual Conference

October 16th 2018, 2:15pm

Alexandria, Va. – The Center for Alcohol Policy is pleased to announce that Chris Curtis, Deputy Secretary to the Board with the Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control Authority (Virginia ABC), is the recipient of the Sixth Annual Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Award.

The award, which recognizes a specific program, agency or person who oversees the alcohol industry and promotes public safety, was presented by the Center’s Advisory Council at the 11th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference, in St. Paul, Minn.

“The Center for Alcohol Policy understands the importance of the work that alcohol regulators do on the front lines of many initiatives in the states aimed at the fair and proper regulation of the alcohol industry, the promotion of public health and safety and the support of a competitive business marketplace,” said Mike Lashbrook, Executive Director of the Center. “This award highlights effective best practices that may serve as examples to alcohol regulators in other states.”

“Chris served in several senior level positions with the Virginia ABC,” continued Lashbrook, “and throughout his distinguished career worked toward a careful balance of public safety and a competitive marketplace.”

Curtis is known for his mentorship, proactive efforts in enforcement and public health, promoting and implementing innovative strategies and a fair and balanced approach to alcohol regulation. He has a willingness to work with all stakeholders and build consensus on important alcohol regulatory issues.

Curtis started with the Virginia ABC as a store clerk, taking on several other roles before his current role as the deputy secretary to the board.

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501 c (3) organization whose mission is to educate policy makers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

 

 

New Report Examines Challenges & Solutions for Fake IDs in Evolving Retail Environment

July 12th 2018, 4:22pm

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – The Center for Alcohol Policy has released a new report, “Fake IDs in America: Challenges of Identification and the Critical Need for Training,” authored by Susan Dworak, CEO of Real Identities, LLC. The report outlines current challenges posed by fake IDs, identifies best practices for verifying identification on alcohol sales, and proactive measures policymakers, regulators and licensees can take to protect against alcohol purchases with fake IDs. Dworak explains that as new technologies and consumer patterns evolve, age verification for purchasing alcohol and other regulated products becomes more challenging – and this is a serious problem for alcohol retailers and their employees as well as for communities and general public health.

“Less than 20 of the 50 states mandate a responsible vendor program and nearly half of those states do not mention ID checking as part of the required curriculum,” explains Dworak, highlighting the need for robust server and gatekeeper training as the number one defense against the fraudulent purchase of alcohol with a fake ID. On the issue of reliance on ID scanners, Dworak points out that scanners cannot detect fraudulent behavior with borrowed or stolen real IDs and that magnetic strips on licenses are easily manipulated. Dworak urges, “[w]e must consider the extent to which we allow convenience to play a role in regulation or enforcement in the protection of society.”

The report also discusses the evolving retail landscape, where online ordering, third-party deliveries and shipments, self-checkout and cashier-less checkout can make ID verification for the purchase of alcohol even more of a challenge. “Regulations need to address all parties involved in the ordering, selling, purchase, and delivery of alcohol,” Dworak continues, “regulations can be drafted to withstand change with universal principles.”

Dworak will share her report in a panel, “Brave New World of Age Verification,” at the 11th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference taking place Oct. 9 – 11 in St. Paul, Minn. See the Conference’s webpage to learn more about the annual conference.

You can find the full report here.

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501c(3) organization whose mission is to educate policymakers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit the Center’s website or follow the Center on Twitter.

Center for Alcohol Policy Recognizes Alcohol Awareness Month

April 6th 2018, 2:17pm

ALEXANDRIA, VA –The Center for Alcohol Policy is joining organizations across the country in April to recognize Alcohol Awareness Month, a nationwide campaign that raises awareness of the problems that alcohol abuse can cause for individuals, their families and their communities.

“Alcohol Awareness Month is a reminder that alcohol is unique and that policymakers, regulators and the public need to be educated on responsible consumption,” said Jim Hall, former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board and current member of the Center’s Advisory Council. “The Center for Alcohol Policy is committed to providing research and educational programming toward this end.”

“The 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution repealed Prohibition in 1933 and established today’s effective system of state-based alcohol regulation,” Hall continued. “And the public supports today’s regulatory system. The Center’s recent national opinion poll found that over 80% of Americans are in support of the existing system for purchasing alcohol in their state and support the state’s ability to regulate alcohol.”

The most recent report released by the Center for Alcohol Policy examines the history and purpose of tied-house prohibitions found in federal and state alcohol laws and explains how these prohibitions are as relevant today as when enacted following the repeal of Prohibition. The report, “The Dangers of Common Ownership in an Uncommon Industry: Alcohol Policy in America and the Timeless Relevance of Tied-House Restrictions,” was authored by former executive counsel for the Louisiana Office of Alcohol and Tobacco Control and alcohol law attorney Jessica C. Starns.

The report illustrates the conflict between the marketplace and public health issues America faced with alcohol pre-Prohibition, how alcohol control policies were formed by the states following Prohibition, and how the current alcohol regulatory system has worked to maintain a vibrant alcohol marketplace while at the same time addressing public health concerns.

The Center’s annual alcohol law and policy conference is one program that highlights alcohol’s unique attributes and the need for its effective regulation. It brings together a wide range of experts in the field of alcohol law – including attorneys, current and former alcohol regulators, state legislators, academic thought leaders, public health advocates and other experts – to discuss and debate current alcohol laws and challenges. The Center’s 11th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference will be held Oct. 9 – 11, 2018, in St. Paul, Minn.

The Sixth Annual Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Award, which recognizes the work of alcohol regulators who oversee the alcohol industry and promote public safety, will be awarded during the conference. Nominations will be accepted until July 20, 2018.

Visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org to learn more about the Center’s programs and initiatives.

 

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501 c (3) organization whose mission is to educate policy makers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

Essay on Modern Goals of Temperance Wins First Place in Center for Alcohol Policy’s 10th Annual Essay Contest

February 14th 2018, 2:57pm

Alexandria, Va. – The Center for Alcohol Policy is pleased to announce that Joseph Uhlman, a third-year law student at the University of Kansas School of Law, has been named the winner of its 10th Annual Essay Contest. The national essay contest is intended to foster debate, analysis and examination of alcohol policy.

To enter the contest, participants were asked to provide thoughtful responses to this:

The Supreme Court has recognized “temperance” as a permissible goal of state alcohol regulation. Define temperance as it would apply in today’s alcohol marketplace. Is it still relevant today? Should temperance still be recognized as a permissible goal of alcohol regulation?

Center for Alcohol Policy Advisory Council member and Samford University Cumberland School of Law Professor Brannon Denning said, “We can learn much from our nation’s history with alcohol, especially looking at the societal problems that led to national Prohibition and the public policy initiatives that were put in place following the passage of the 21st Amendment, which repealed Prohibition and began today’s system of state-based alcohol regulation,” Denning continued. “This essay contest offers the opportunity to continue the examination of how alcohol regulations remain relevant today.”

Submissions were received from across the country, California to Florida and Oregon to New Hampshire; from high school and college students to law school students; and from a diverse set of professions ranging from paralegal to registered nurse to a martial arts instructor.

Uhlman’s winning essay, “The Syntax of the Sin Tax: Why Redefining Temperance Will Promote Defensible Alcohol Legislation in Today’s Marketplace,” presented a case to redefine temperance in recognition of the evolving alcohol marketplace and current society. “… If we accept that temperance as a modern concept is alive and well, then we can redefine it to reflect its current place in society,” Uhlman explained. “But the current state of temperance is unwell,” Uhlman continued, “To revive temperance’s standing in both the public eye and in the courts, a reliable legal definition is needed that addresses both modern social concerns about alcohol while comporting to changes in technology and commerce that impact its use and distribution.” Uhlman asserted that redefining temperance “would be a major win for temperance advocates, because it takes a currently ambiguous term of art that the Supreme Court has recognized as Constitutionally important and redefines it on solid ground.”

Uhlman concluded, “To keep temperance relevant in today’s world, and to protect the modern goals of temperance in the courts, it should be redefined as: policies and laws that promote moderation in the use of intoxicating drink for the purpose of promoting health and safety.”

Timothy Gervais, a high school librarian at John Adams Academy in Roseville, Calif., was awarded second place for his essay, “A Return to Temperance: Regulation, Cultural Change, and Private Temperance in the Modern Age.” Gervais explained, “The idea that individuals should moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages to mitigate negative health and societal issues is far from a radical religious claim.” Noting how public health has improved because of temperance efforts, the essay concluded, “If Prohibition was a failure, Prohibitionism was a forgotten triumph.”

Henrik Born, a third-year law student and Senior Articles Editor of the Journal of Law and Business at New York University School of Law, was awarded third place for his essay, “What’s in a name? A Study of Temperance in American History and a Proposal for Redefinition.” The essay explained how a balanced definition of temperance should be backed by research and promoted through education of the public health and safety risks of unchecked alcohol consumption. Henrik concluded that, “…balanced temperance requires a multi-faceted approach to regulation that starts with a stronger emphasis on research.”

The winning entrants received prizes of $5,000, $2,500 and $1,000 respectively.

To read the winning essays, please visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org/essay-contest.

Photo Downloads:

Joseph Uhlman – First Place

Timothy Gervais – Second Place

Henrik Born – Third Place

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501 c(3) organization whose mission is to educate policy makers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

Center for Alcohol Policy Marks Anniversary of 21st Amendment

December 4th 2017, 3:36pm

21st Amendment Repealed Prohibition and Launched Today’s State-Based Alcohol Regulatory System

Alexandria, Va. – On Tuesday, Dec. 5, the Center for Alcohol Policy will commemorate the 84th  anniversary of the ratification of the 21st Amendment to the United States Constitution. On that date in 1933, Prohibition ended in the United States when 36 states (the requisite three-fourths majority of the then 48 states) ratified the 21st Amendment to the United States Constitution, thereby repealing the 18th Amendment which began Prohibition in 1920.

For more than 80 years, the United States and its citizens have benefited from a state-based system of alcohol regulation, established following ratification of the 21st Amendment, which gives each state the primary authority to enact and enforce alcohol laws consistent with the desires and needs of its citizens.

“The repeal of the failed, one-size-fits-all policy of national Prohibition was not the end of the story – it’s where the story of today’s successful system began,” said Mike Lashbrook, executive director for the Center. “The 21st Amendment recognized that alcohol is a unique product that is best controlled by individual states, and it provided a solution that continues to be effective today.”

“The state-based system of alcohol regulation has been extremely effective at supporting a competitive marketplace while at the same time promoting public safety,” Lashbrook continued. “America does not experience large problems with bootlegging, counterfeit products or a black market, which were common during national Prohibition and have proven deadly in other parts of the world that lack an effective regulatory system for alcohol.”

According to a recently released national poll commissioned by the Center, 89% of adults agree that it is very important to keep the American alcohol industry regulated and 81% of Americans are in support of the existing system for purchasing alcohol in their state and support the state’s ability to regulate alcohol.

A report by former Chief Counsel for the United States Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau Robert M. Tobiassen, “The ‘Fake Alcohol’ Situation in the United States: The Impact of Culture, Market Economics, and the Current Regulatory Systems,” explains why there are few incidents of fake alcohol products in the United States. The study describes “strong regulatory systems that police the production, importation, distribution and retail sales of alcohol beverages through independent parties” and the country’s “competitive marketplace that provides alcohol beverages at all price points including inexpensive safe (in a quality control context) alcohol beverages thereby negating the demand for fake alcohol (except for moonshine).”

Visit the Center for Alcohol Policy website to watch a video about the origin of America’s state-based alcohol regulatory system and to learn about the Center’s republication of Toward Liquor Control, written in 1933 to help guide alcohol policy in the states post-Prohibition. The website also features national polling research on Americans attitudes toward alcohol regulation and a guide to the basics of alcohol beverage control for new state alcohol regulators.

 

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501 (c)(3) organization whose mission is to educate policymakers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

New Report Analyzes Implementation of Alcohol Wholesaler Registration Scheme

September 26th 2017, 1:09pm

Former TTB Chief Counsel Examines the Importance of a Regulated Distribution System for Alcohol

Alexandria, Va. – The Center for Alcohol Policy released a new report, “Combatting Fake, Counterfeit, and Contraband Alcohol Challenges in the United Kingdom through the Alcohol Wholesaler Registration Scheme (AWRS),” authored by Robert Tobiassen, the former Chief Counsel at the Treasury Department’s Alcohol Tax and Trade Bureau.

The report is a follow up to his 2014 report, “The ‘Fake Alcohol’ Situation in the United States: The Impact of Culture, Market Economics, and the Current Regulatory Systems,” that examined the high number of incidences of fake alcohol in countries around the world, compared to the low number of incidences in the United States. The 2014 study found a large number of incidences of fake alcohol in the U.K., which is noteworthy as the major difference between the United States and U.K. is the structure of the alcohol regulatory system. Since the 2014 study, the U.K. has adopted the AWRS to combat fraud, tax evasion and fake alcohol. The adoption of the AWRS by the U.K. recognizes the importance of registered wholesalers in the alcohol industry and the increased accountability they provide to ensure the path for legitimate alcohol products.

The 2017 report summarizes the processes and considerations for the adoption and implementation of the AWRS in the U.K. and examines the critical importance of a domestic distribution system as sound regulatory policy. Tobiassen explains the U.K.’s annual loss of approximately £1.2 billion ($1.5 billion) in excise duty as largely due to a “weaknesses in the distribution system,” now addressed by the AWRS. “The public evolution and formal adoption of the AWRS shows the importance of regulatory controls over the wholesale activity in the effort to combat fake, counterfeit, contraband and illicit alcohol,” concludes Tobiassen.

In the report, Tobiassen suggests that as the U.K. refines and improves this new system, it “consider lessons from the United States’ experience in the distribution of alcohol,” especially the independence of suppliers, wholesalers and retailers in a three-tier system.

Recent polling by the Center for Alcohol Policy highlights that public safety and concerns about proper alcohol regulation are most important to the American public. This includes 81 percent support for the required use of wholesalers. The Tobiassen report highlights the U.K. activities in the distribution of alcohol that serve as a contrast to the effective, accountable and working system of alcohol regulation in the United States.

Click here to download the full report.

 

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501c(3) organization whose mission is to educate policy makers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

Center for Alcohol Policy Marks Constitution Day

September 15th 2017, 9:34am

Educational Resources Highlight 21st Amendment as Origin of America’s State-Based Regulatory System

Alexandria, Va. – This Constitution Day, celebrated annually on Sept. 17, the Center for Alcohol Policy is highlighting its educational resources that explain the 21st Amendment’s role in establishing America’s state-based regulatory system.

The Center for Alcohol Policy video The Origins of America’s State-Based Regulatory System illustrates the origin of today’s alcohol regulatory system, which works to balance alcohol control with an orderly and competitive marketplace.

The video features Center for Alcohol Policy advisors Brannon Denning, associate dean professor at Samford University’s Cumberland School of Law, and Jerry Oliver, Sr., former Arizona alcohol regulator and chief of police for Detroit, Richmond and Pasadena.

“The 21st Amendment was important because not only did it repeal Prohibition but it also returned control over alcohol policy where it belongs, to state and local governments who can determine what kinds of policies serve the needs of their citizens best,” Denning said.

The video describes the Center’s republication of the book Toward Liquor Control, which outlined how states should regulate the sale and serving of alcohol following the repeal of Prohibition, and how the book is still helping shape policy today.

“It gives the tenets for why alcohol should be controlled at the local level, why states and local jurisdiction are to have the final say as to how alcohol is accessed and how it’s distributed,” said Oliver.

“It’s clear that what’s acceptable in Nevada isn’t necessarily acceptable in Utah,” added Denning. “The 21st Amendment and the flexibility of state-based regulation allows those local differences to be taken into account.”

Another educational resource that explains the 21st Amendment’s role in establishing America’s state-based alcohol regulatory system and offers tips for those charged with enforcing state laws today is the brief guide, “Alcohol Beverage Control: The Basics for New State Alcohol Regulators,” written by former alcohol regulator Roger B. Johnson, a 38-year veteran of the Alcohol & Tobacco Enforcement Unit of the Wisconsin Department of Revenue, and published by the Center.

The Center also supported the development of a “Toast the Constitution!” lesson plan. Through a partnership with the Bill of Rights Institute, this resource helps educators teach students about the origins of the 18th Amendment, the individuals and groups who fought for and against Prohibition, and the events that led to its repeal with the passage of the 21st Amendment.

To learn more about the Center for Alcohol Policy and its programs, please visit www.centerforalcholpolicy.org.

 

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501 c (3) organization whose mission is to educate policy makers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation.  By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption.  For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

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Center for Alcohol Policy
1101 King Street Ste 600-A Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: (703) 519-3090 info@centerforalcoholpolicy.org