11th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference Education Sessions Announced

August 9th 2018, 1:44pm

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – The Center for Alcohol Policy’s 11th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference taking place Oct. 9 – 11, 2018, in St. Paul, Minn., will feature educational sessions that address a variety of current and developing alcohol policy issues. The sessions will be led by a wide range of experts, including legislators, educators, regulators, public health advocates and industry officials.

This year’s educational sessions will include:

  • Brave New World of Age Verification: This panel will explore fraudulent ID’s, e-commerce and current challenges with age verification and underage drinking.
  • High-Risk Drinking on College Campuses: Can we make a difference?
  • Another Date with the Supremes?: Is there one, or more, alcohol-related court challenges poised for the Supremes?
  • Toward Marijuana Control: Can lessons from Toward Liquor Control help guide marijuana regulators?
  • State of the States: Leading state legislators explore alcohol regulatory developments in the states.
  • (Happy) Hoppy Trails: Exploring challenges and opportunities with alcohol tourism – trails, festivals, tasting rooms and more.
  • Can I (Anti)trust You?: This panel will discuss the federal antitrust issues in the review of the largest alcohol supplier merger in history, outstanding issues as well as state antitrust issues impacting alcohol regulation.
  • Trade Practices Update: This breakout out session will explore federal and state regulators’ increased focus on trade practice enforcement.

For full session details, please download the conference brochure. Sessions are subject to change. Additions or updates will be posted to the conference page.

Registration can be completed online or by mailing a completed registration form with payment. You must have Adobe Acrobat Reader or Full to complete the fillable form on a computer, or alternatively, you can print the document and manually fill out the form.

Be sure to register before October 3 to take advantage of early bird registration rates. Government and non-profit employees receive special discounted registration at $199 or $299 after October 3. The full registrant rate is $699 or $799 after October 3.

The official conference hotel is The Saint Paul Hotel. For reservations, book online or call 800-292-9292 and indicate that you are attending the Center for Alcohol Policy’s Alcohol Law and Policy Conference.

Book your hotel room by September 18 to secure the negotiated single/double group rate of $169 per night plus tax, or the $149 per night plus tax government rate. To book the single/double rate online, select your arrival and departure dates and enter 181009CAP as the group rate, or ask for the “Center for Alcohol Policy Conference Standard” when you call. To book the government rate online, select your arrival and departure dates an enter 181009APG as the group code, or ask for the “Center for Alcohol Policy Government” when you call. Guests receiving the government rate for guest rooms will be required to present a government employee I.D. upon check-in. Once the room block is sold, rooms and rates cannot be guaranteed.

 

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501c(3) organization whose mission is to educate policymakers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

New Report Examines Challenges & Solutions for Fake IDs in Evolving Retail Environment

July 12th 2018, 4:22pm

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – The Center for Alcohol Policy has released a new report, “Fake IDs in America: Challenges of Identification and the Critical Need for Training,” authored by Susan Dworak, CEO of Real Identities, LLC. The report outlines current challenges posed by fake IDs, identifies best practices for verifying identification on alcohol sales, and proactive measures policymakers, regulators and licensees can take to protect against alcohol purchases with fake IDs. Dworak explains that as new technologies and consumer patterns evolve, age verification for purchasing alcohol and other regulated products becomes more challenging – and this is a serious problem for alcohol retailers and their employees as well as for communities and general public health.

“Less than 20 of the 50 states mandate a responsible vendor program and nearly half of those states do not mention ID checking as part of the required curriculum,” explains Dworak, highlighting the need for robust server and gatekeeper training as the number one defense against the fraudulent purchase of alcohol with a fake ID. On the issue of reliance on ID scanners, Dworak points out that scanners cannot detect fraudulent behavior with borrowed or stolen real IDs and that magnetic strips on licenses are easily manipulated. Dworak urges, “[w]e must consider the extent to which we allow convenience to play a role in regulation or enforcement in the protection of society.”

The report also discusses the evolving retail landscape, where online ordering, third-party deliveries and shipments, self-checkout and cashier-less checkout can make ID verification for the purchase of alcohol even more of a challenge. “Regulations need to address all parties involved in the ordering, selling, purchase, and delivery of alcohol,” Dworak continues, “regulations can be drafted to withstand change with universal principles.”

Dworak will share her report in a panel, “Brave New World of Age Verification,” at the 11th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference taking place Oct. 9 – 11 in St. Paul, Minn. See the Conference’s webpage to learn more about the annual conference.

You can find the full report here.

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501c(3) organization whose mission is to educate policymakers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit the Center’s website or follow the Center on Twitter.

Registration Open for the 11th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference

June 26th 2018, 2:59pm

ALEXANDRIA, Va. Registration is now open for the Center for Alcohol Policy’s 11th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference. This annual event brings together a wide range of experts in the field of alcohol law – including state regulators, attorneys general, legislators, public health leaders, educators and industry officials – to discuss and debate current alcohol laws and policies. The Alcohol Law and Policy Conference will offer a variety of sessions addressing current topics in alcohol law and policy with expert presenters and panelists.

There are two ways to register. Register online or submit a completed registration form by mail with payment. You must have Adobe Acrobat Reader or Full to complete the fillable form on a computer, or alternatively, you can print the document and manually fill out the form.

Be sure to register before October 3 to take advantage of early bird registration rates. Government and non-profit employees receive special discounted registration at $199, or $299 after October 3. The full registrant rate is $699, or $799 after October 3.

For hotel reservations at the official conference hotel, The Saint Paul Hotel, book online or call 800-292-9292 and indicate that you are attending the Center for Alcohol Policy’s Alcohol Law and Policy Conference.

Book by September 18 to secure the negotiated single/double group rate of $169 per night plus tax, or the $149 per night plus tax government rate. To book the single/double rate online, select your arrival and departure dates and enter 181009CAP as the group rate, or ask for the “Center for Alcohol Policy Conference Standard” when you call. To book the government rate online, select your arrival and departure dates an enter 181009APG as the group code, or ask for the “Center for Alcohol Policy Government” when you call. Once the room block is sold, rooms and rates cannot be guaranteed.

More details about the 2018 Alcohol Law and Policy Conference will be posted on the Center’s website, as they become available.

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501c(3) organization whose mission is to educate policymakers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

Center for Alcohol Policy Announces 11th Annual Essay Contest

May 23rd 2018, 9:44am

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – The Center for Alcohol Policy is now accepting entries for its 11th Annual National Essay Contest. The topic for this year’s contest is:

The licensing of individuals and businesses that are involved in the commerce of alcoholic beverages is an important feature of state-based alcohol regulation. Why is licensing necessary for an orderly marketplace, what impact does it have on public health and safety and what are the benefits provided by licensing systems?

“The Center’s Essay Contest is intended to foster debate, analysis and examination of state alcohol regulation and its implications for citizens across the United States,” said Brannon Denning, Center for Alcohol Policy advisor and Samford University Cumberland School of Law professor.

“We can learn a lot from our nation’s history with alcohol, especially looking at the societal problems that led to national Prohibition and the public policy initiatives that were put in place following the passage of the 21st Amendment, which repealed Prohibition and began today’s system of state-based alcohol regulation,” Denning continued. “This essay contest offers the opportunity to continue the examination of how alcohol regulations remain relevant today.”

WHO CAN ENTER: The contest is open to all persons who are over the age of 18 as of December 2018. Students, academics, practicing attorneys, policymakers and the general public are encouraged to submit essays.

HOW TO ENTER: Essay submissions must be received by 5:30 p.m. EST on Dec. 7, 2018. Essays submitted after this deadline will not be considered. Entries may be submitted through this form.

DEADLINE: The deadline for entries is Dec. 7, 2018. Winners will be announced in early 2019.

AWARDS: Cash prizes will be awarded to the first, second and third place winners in the amounts of $5,000, $2,500 and $1,000 respectively.

To read essay guidelines and last year’s winning essays, please visit the Center’s website. For more information, please email info@centerforalcoholpolicy.org.

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501c(3) organization whose mission is to educate policymakers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

Center for Alcohol Policy Recognizes Alcohol Awareness Month

April 6th 2018, 2:17pm

ALEXANDRIA, VA –The Center for Alcohol Policy is joining organizations across the country in April to recognize Alcohol Awareness Month, a nationwide campaign that raises awareness of the problems that alcohol abuse can cause for individuals, their families and their communities.

“Alcohol Awareness Month is a reminder that alcohol is unique and that policymakers, regulators and the public need to be educated on responsible consumption,” said Jim Hall, former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board and current member of the Center’s Advisory Council. “The Center for Alcohol Policy is committed to providing research and educational programming toward this end.”

“The 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution repealed Prohibition in 1933 and established today’s effective system of state-based alcohol regulation,” Hall continued. “And the public supports today’s regulatory system. The Center’s recent national opinion poll found that over 80% of Americans are in support of the existing system for purchasing alcohol in their state and support the state’s ability to regulate alcohol.”

The most recent report released by the Center for Alcohol Policy examines the history and purpose of tied-house prohibitions found in federal and state alcohol laws and explains how these prohibitions are as relevant today as when enacted following the repeal of Prohibition. The report, “The Dangers of Common Ownership in an Uncommon Industry: Alcohol Policy in America and the Timeless Relevance of Tied-House Restrictions,” was authored by former executive counsel for the Louisiana Office of Alcohol and Tobacco Control and alcohol law attorney Jessica C. Starns.

The report illustrates the conflict between the marketplace and public health issues America faced with alcohol pre-Prohibition, how alcohol control policies were formed by the states following Prohibition, and how the current alcohol regulatory system has worked to maintain a vibrant alcohol marketplace while at the same time addressing public health concerns.

The Center’s annual alcohol law and policy conference is one program that highlights alcohol’s unique attributes and the need for its effective regulation. It brings together a wide range of experts in the field of alcohol law – including attorneys, current and former alcohol regulators, state legislators, academic thought leaders, public health advocates and other experts – to discuss and debate current alcohol laws and challenges. The Center’s 11th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference will be held Oct. 9 – 11, 2018, in St. Paul, Minn.

The Sixth Annual Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Award, which recognizes the work of alcohol regulators who oversee the alcohol industry and promote public safety, will be awarded during the conference. Nominations will be accepted until July 20, 2018.

Visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org to learn more about the Center’s programs and initiatives.

 

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501 c (3) organization whose mission is to educate policy makers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

Nominations Open for Sixth Annual Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Award

March 15th 2018, 1:21pm

ALEXANDRIA, VA – The Center for Alcohol Policy is now accepting nominations for the Sixth Annual Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Award to be presented at the Center’s 11th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference, October 9 – 11 at The Saint Paul Hotel in St. Paul, Minn.

The award recognizes the work of alcohol regulators who oversee the alcohol industry and promote public safety. Any governmental agency or its employees working to promote and enforce alcohol laws and regulations are eligible for the award. A specific program that has achieved positive results or an individual within an agency going above and beyond the call of duty are examples of potential nominees.

In 2017, Kathie Durbin, chief of licensure, regulation and education at the Montgomery County, Md., Department of Liquor Control, was honored with the Fifth Annual Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Award for her work to create and oversee the many educational resources provided by the department that not only protect public safety, but also improve the business environment in the county.

“The Center for Alcohol Policy appreciates that alcohol regulators are on the front lines of many initiatives in the states aimed at keeping the alcohol industry properly regulated, promoting public health and safety and supporting a competitive business marketplace,” said Jerry Oliver, a Center Advisory Council member, who has served as an alcohol regulator and police chief. “This award highlights effective best practices that may serve as examples to alcohol regulators in other states.”

Nominations should provide information on how the nominee serves as an example to others in alcohol regulation. Consideration will be given to how the actions of this nominee are helpful to other agencies or employees, achieve desired results and engage or impact a broad coalition of stakeholders. Self-nominations are permitted, and letters of support are encouraged.

HOW TO NOMINATE: Nomination forms may be emailed to awards@centerforalcoholpolicy.org or mailed to: Center for Alcohol Policy, Attn: Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Award; 1101 King St., Suite 600-A; Alexandria, VA 22314.

DEADLINE: The deadline for nominations is July 20, 2018, 5:30 p.m. EDT. Nominations postmarked/emailed after this deadline will not be considered.

AWARD: The Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Award recipient will be honored during the Center’s 11th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference in St. Paul, Minn. The award recipient also may be eligible to receive complimentary registration and a speaking opportunity at a future Alcohol Law and Policy Conference.

For more information, please call (703) 519-3090 or email info@centerforalcoholpolicy.org.

 

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501 c (3) organization whose mission is to educate policy makers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation.  By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption.  For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

Essay on Modern Goals of Temperance Wins First Place in Center for Alcohol Policy’s 10th Annual Essay Contest

February 14th 2018, 2:57pm

Alexandria, Va. – The Center for Alcohol Policy is pleased to announce that Joseph Uhlman, a third-year law student at the University of Kansas School of Law, has been named the winner of its 10th Annual Essay Contest. The national essay contest is intended to foster debate, analysis and examination of alcohol policy.

To enter the contest, participants were asked to provide thoughtful responses to this:

The Supreme Court has recognized “temperance” as a permissible goal of state alcohol regulation. Define temperance as it would apply in today’s alcohol marketplace. Is it still relevant today? Should temperance still be recognized as a permissible goal of alcohol regulation?

Center for Alcohol Policy Advisory Council member and Samford University Cumberland School of Law Professor Brannon Denning said, “We can learn much from our nation’s history with alcohol, especially looking at the societal problems that led to national Prohibition and the public policy initiatives that were put in place following the passage of the 21st Amendment, which repealed Prohibition and began today’s system of state-based alcohol regulation,” Denning continued. “This essay contest offers the opportunity to continue the examination of how alcohol regulations remain relevant today.”

Submissions were received from across the country, California to Florida and Oregon to New Hampshire; from high school and college students to law school students; and from a diverse set of professions ranging from paralegal to registered nurse to a martial arts instructor.

Uhlman’s winning essay, “The Syntax of the Sin Tax: Why Redefining Temperance Will Promote Defensible Alcohol Legislation in Today’s Marketplace,” presented a case to redefine temperance in recognition of the evolving alcohol marketplace and current society. “… If we accept that temperance as a modern concept is alive and well, then we can redefine it to reflect its current place in society,” Uhlman explained. “But the current state of temperance is unwell,” Uhlman continued, “To revive temperance’s standing in both the public eye and in the courts, a reliable legal definition is needed that addresses both modern social concerns about alcohol while comporting to changes in technology and commerce that impact its use and distribution.” Uhlman asserted that redefining temperance “would be a major win for temperance advocates, because it takes a currently ambiguous term of art that the Supreme Court has recognized as Constitutionally important and redefines it on solid ground.”

Uhlman concluded, “To keep temperance relevant in today’s world, and to protect the modern goals of temperance in the courts, it should be redefined as: policies and laws that promote moderation in the use of intoxicating drink for the purpose of promoting health and safety.”

Timothy Gervais, a high school librarian at John Adams Academy in Roseville, Calif., was awarded second place for his essay, “A Return to Temperance: Regulation, Cultural Change, and Private Temperance in the Modern Age.” Gervais explained, “The idea that individuals should moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages to mitigate negative health and societal issues is far from a radical religious claim.” Noting how public health has improved because of temperance efforts, the essay concluded, “If Prohibition was a failure, Prohibitionism was a forgotten triumph.”

Henrik Born, a third-year law student and Senior Articles Editor of the Journal of Law and Business at New York University School of Law, was awarded third place for his essay, “What’s in a name? A Study of Temperance in American History and a Proposal for Redefinition.” The essay explained how a balanced definition of temperance should be backed by research and promoted through education of the public health and safety risks of unchecked alcohol consumption. Henrik concluded that, “…balanced temperance requires a multi-faceted approach to regulation that starts with a stronger emphasis on research.”

The winning entrants received prizes of $5,000, $2,500 and $1,000 respectively.

To read the winning essays, please visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org/essay-contest.

Photo Downloads:

Joseph Uhlman – First Place

Timothy Gervais – Second Place

Henrik Born – Third Place

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501 c(3) organization whose mission is to educate policy makers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

Center for Alcohol Policy Marks Anniversary of 21st Amendment

December 4th 2017, 3:36pm

21st Amendment Repealed Prohibition and Launched Today’s State-Based Alcohol Regulatory System

Alexandria, Va. – On Tuesday, Dec. 5, the Center for Alcohol Policy will commemorate the 84th  anniversary of the ratification of the 21st Amendment to the United States Constitution. On that date in 1933, Prohibition ended in the United States when 36 states (the requisite three-fourths majority of the then 48 states) ratified the 21st Amendment to the United States Constitution, thereby repealing the 18th Amendment which began Prohibition in 1920.

For more than 80 years, the United States and its citizens have benefited from a state-based system of alcohol regulation, established following ratification of the 21st Amendment, which gives each state the primary authority to enact and enforce alcohol laws consistent with the desires and needs of its citizens.

“The repeal of the failed, one-size-fits-all policy of national Prohibition was not the end of the story – it’s where the story of today’s successful system began,” said Mike Lashbrook, executive director for the Center. “The 21st Amendment recognized that alcohol is a unique product that is best controlled by individual states, and it provided a solution that continues to be effective today.”

“The state-based system of alcohol regulation has been extremely effective at supporting a competitive marketplace while at the same time promoting public safety,” Lashbrook continued. “America does not experience large problems with bootlegging, counterfeit products or a black market, which were common during national Prohibition and have proven deadly in other parts of the world that lack an effective regulatory system for alcohol.”

According to a recently released national poll commissioned by the Center, 89% of adults agree that it is very important to keep the American alcohol industry regulated and 81% of Americans are in support of the existing system for purchasing alcohol in their state and support the state’s ability to regulate alcohol.

A report by former Chief Counsel for the United States Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau Robert M. Tobiassen, “The ‘Fake Alcohol’ Situation in the United States: The Impact of Culture, Market Economics, and the Current Regulatory Systems,” explains why there are few incidents of fake alcohol products in the United States. The study describes “strong regulatory systems that police the production, importation, distribution and retail sales of alcohol beverages through independent parties” and the country’s “competitive marketplace that provides alcohol beverages at all price points including inexpensive safe (in a quality control context) alcohol beverages thereby negating the demand for fake alcohol (except for moonshine).”

Visit the Center for Alcohol Policy website to watch a video about the origin of America’s state-based alcohol regulatory system and to learn about the Center’s republication of Toward Liquor Control, written in 1933 to help guide alcohol policy in the states post-Prohibition. The website also features national polling research on Americans attitudes toward alcohol regulation and a guide to the basics of alcohol beverage control for new state alcohol regulators.

 

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501 (c)(3) organization whose mission is to educate policymakers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

Deadline Approaches for Center for Alcohol Policy Essay Contest

November 21st 2017, 9:57am

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – Only two weeks remain to enter the Center for Alcohol Policy’s 10th Annual National Essay Contest. The Center will accept entries through Dec. 1, 2017. The topic for this year’s contest is:

The Supreme Court has recognized “temperance” as a permissible goal of state alcohol regulation. Define temperance as it would apply in today’s alcohol marketplace. Is it still relevant today? Should temperance still be recognized as a permissible goal of alcohol regulation?

“The Center Essay Contest is intended to foster debate, analysis and examination of state alcohol regulation and its implications for citizens across the United States,” said Brannon Denning, Center for Alcohol Policy advisor and Samford University Cumberland School of Law professor.

“We can learn a lot from our nation’s history with alcohol, especially looking at the societal problems that led to national Prohibition and the public policy initiatives that were put in place following the passage of the 21st Amendment, which repealed Prohibition and began today’s system of state-based alcohol regulation,” Denning continued. “This essay contest offers the opportunity to continue the examination of how alcohol regulations remain relevant today.”

WHO CAN ENTER: The contest is open to all persons who are over the age of 18 as of December 2017. Students, academics, practicing attorneys, policymakers and members of the general public are encouraged to submit essays.

HOW TO ENTER: Essays may be emailed to essay@centerforalcoholpolicy.org or mailed as a hard copy to: Center for Alcohol Policy; Attn: Essay Contest; 1101 King St., Suite 600-A; Alexandria, VA, 22314. Essays must be accompanied by an entry form.

DEADLINE: The deadline for entries is Dec. 1, 2017. Winners will be announced in early 2018.

AWARDS: Cash prizes will be awarded to the first, second and third place winners in the amounts of $5,000, $2,500 and $1,000 respectively.

To read essay guidelines and last year’s winning essays, please visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org/essay-contest. For more information, please call (703) 519-3090.

 

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501c(3) organization whose mission is to educate policymakers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

New Report Analyzes Implementation of Alcohol Wholesaler Registration Scheme

September 26th 2017, 1:09pm

Former TTB Chief Counsel Examines the Importance of a Regulated Distribution System for Alcohol

Alexandria, Va. – The Center for Alcohol Policy released a new report, “Combatting Fake, Counterfeit, and Contraband Alcohol Challenges in the United Kingdom through the Alcohol Wholesaler Registration Scheme (AWRS),” authored by Robert Tobiassen, the former Chief Counsel at the Treasury Department’s Alcohol Tax and Trade Bureau.

The report is a follow up to his 2014 report, “The ‘Fake Alcohol’ Situation in the United States: The Impact of Culture, Market Economics, and the Current Regulatory Systems,” that examined the high number of incidences of fake alcohol in countries around the world, compared to the low number of incidences in the United States. The 2014 study found a large number of incidences of fake alcohol in the U.K., which is noteworthy as the major difference between the United States and U.K. is the structure of the alcohol regulatory system. Since the 2014 study, the U.K. has adopted the AWRS to combat fraud, tax evasion and fake alcohol. The adoption of the AWRS by the U.K. recognizes the importance of registered wholesalers in the alcohol industry and the increased accountability they provide to ensure the path for legitimate alcohol products.

The 2017 report summarizes the processes and considerations for the adoption and implementation of the AWRS in the U.K. and examines the critical importance of a domestic distribution system as sound regulatory policy. Tobiassen explains the U.K.’s annual loss of approximately £1.2 billion ($1.5 billion) in excise duty as largely due to a “weaknesses in the distribution system,” now addressed by the AWRS. “The public evolution and formal adoption of the AWRS shows the importance of regulatory controls over the wholesale activity in the effort to combat fake, counterfeit, contraband and illicit alcohol,” concludes Tobiassen.

In the report, Tobiassen suggests that as the U.K. refines and improves this new system, it “consider lessons from the United States’ experience in the distribution of alcohol,” especially the independence of suppliers, wholesalers and retailers in a three-tier system.

Recent polling by the Center for Alcohol Policy highlights that public safety and concerns about proper alcohol regulation are most important to the American public. This includes 81 percent support for the required use of wholesalers. The Tobiassen report highlights the U.K. activities in the distribution of alcohol that serve as a contrast to the effective, accountable and working system of alcohol regulation in the United States.

Click here to download the full report.

 

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501c(3) organization whose mission is to educate policy makers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

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Center for Alcohol Policy
1101 King Street Ste 600-A Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: (703) 519-3090 info@centerforalcoholpolicy.org