10 Years Later: The Need for State Alcohol Regulatory Funding

The Center for Alcohol Policy recently released a whitepaper that revisits a 2013 report of the same name highlighting the importance of funding for alcohol regulatory agencies to accomplish their respective missions.

Written by former Michigan Liquor Control Commissioner and former Michigan House of Representatives Floor Leader Pat Gagliardi in collaboration with J.T. Griffin of Griffin Strategies and former Chief Government Affairs Officer of Mothers Against Drunk Driving, this updated report analyzes the publicly available funding levels of state agencies, the number of alcohol agents in states across the country, their increasing workload and scope of responsibilities as well as the record number of licensees enforcement agents must monitor.

“Our report highlights how state alcohol regulators are tasked with the complex job of managing public safety and health issues that result from alcohol sales,” said J.T. Griffin, when asked about the report.

“It is critical that these agencies are fully staffed and funded in order to protect the public,” Pat Gagliardi added. “Over the past 90 years, state regulators have kept communities reasonably safe from the potential harmful effects of alcohol. This article urges leaders to continue to recognize the value of investing in and maintaining the alcohol regulatory structure.”

A decade on from the publishing of “The Need for State Alcohol Regulatory Funding: Fighting Deregulation by Defunding,” this update highlights that many of the same issues remain and observes that a growing national population and increase in alcohol licenses has often outpaced any increases in budgets.

Center for Alcohol Policy Advisory Council member Jerry Oliver said of the report, “Regulators need adequate funding in order to properly carry out their public health, safety and competition functions. Today’s report shows there is much work yet to be done to give state agencies the tools needed to properly and effectively regulate this growing and diverse marketplace.”  

Virginia Attorney Wins First Place in Center for Alcohol Policy Writing Competition

The Center for Alcohol Policy is pleased to announce that Patrick Glen has been named the winner of its 15th annual writing competition. Glen is also an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center.

The national writing competition is intended to foster debate, analysis, and examination of alcohol policy in the 21st Century. This past year’s topic served as a nod to the 90th anniversary of the 21st Amendment and asked respondents to reflect on the impact of this amendment over the course of the last century.

“90 years ago, this nation undertook a raw exercise of political power only done 26 other times in our country’s 235 year constitutional history. The 21st Amendment was passed in 1933 and it performed two critically important actions. First, it repealed National Prohibition caused by the 18th Amendment. Second, the 21st Amendment put regulation of alcohol primarily in the control of the states.

Fast forward 90 years and reflect, does the 21st Amendment work? Has it achieved what it set out to do: provide for an orderly marketplace, prevent abuse of the product, and protect public health and safety?”

Glen’s winning submission “Distilling Purpose: Revisionist History and the Supreme Court’s Shifting Interpretation of the Twenty-First Amendment” provides an in-depth analysis of the 21st Amendment’s relationship to the Dormant Commerce Clause, delving into the history of the amendment, legal challenges and the implications for state law.

“History, context, and precedent establish the purpose of the Twenty-First Amendment: to enact a rule of constitutional authority permitting State regulation of alcohol unfettered by the dormant Commerce Clause.  This purpose, consistently recognized and applied for fifty years following the Amendment’s ratification, has been abrogated by the contemporary Supreme Court, which has instead reinjected the Commerce-Clause limitations the Amendment was meant to nullify back into the analysis of state law.  So long as the Supreme Court hews to this erroneous path, it will be impossible for the Twenty-First Amendment to fulfill its true purpose,” writes Glen.

Second Place: Joseph Ojih

Joseph Ojih, Adjunct Professor at Baltimore City Community College and Morgan State University, placed second with their essay “The 21st Amendment: Reflections 90 Years Later.” Ojih’s submission explores the positive impacts on public health and safety offered by the 21st Amendment as well as the creation of orderly marketplaces for alcohol.

In reflecting on the legacy of the 21st Amendment, Ojih writes, “[a] critical aspect of the end of Prohibition was the empowerment of individual states with autonomy in alcohol regulation… Thus, the post-Prohibition era in the United States saw the establishment of a system where alcohol could be consumed in a manner that was both safe and responsible, reflecting a balance between individual freedoms and public welfare.”

Dr. Ojih holds a Ph.D. in Finance and has taught business statistics and finance for more than a decade.

Third Place: Ben Sheppard

Receiving third place for their essay, “The Ghosts of Prohibition: Considering whether the 21st Amendment has fulfilled critical policy objectives,” Ben Sheppard, an associate attorney with Norris McLaughlin in Allentown, PA takes a contrary view from Ojih and Glen positing that while the 21st Amendment, in collaboration with the Federal Tax and Trade Bureau, has created safer products, a fragmented marketplace makes it challenging to do business in the alcohol sector.

Sheppard highlights the important role the TTB plays “in regulating alcoholic beverages is not just about maintaining legal and safety standards; it is also about fostering trust and transparency in an industry that directly impacts public health.”

Sheppard is a graduate from George Washington University Law School and the University of Pittsburgh.

Conference registration and room block are open

Registration for the Center for Alcohol Policy’s 17th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference is officially open! The 2024 ALPC will be held Monday, August 26 – Wednesday, August 28, 2024 in Indianapolis, IN at the Hyatt Regency Indianapolis.

As one of the most valuable conferences on the calendar – and one of the very few with open registration – the Center is proud to offer everyone a seat at the table. From public health and safety advocates to regulators, industry members to legislators – all are welcome, and all are invited to attend our annual flagship conference!

Center hosts successful webinar commemorating 90th Anniversary of the 21st Amendment

The Center for Alcohol policy was pleased to host this webinar where our panelists led a fascinating conversation about the global history of Prohibition and the 21st Amendment!

90 years ago on December 5, 1933, the 21st Amendment was ratified by the states repealing the 18th Amendment and giving way to the creation of our current state-based alcohol regulatory scheme.

This succinct amendment ended the nationwide prohibition of alcohol and gave states the authority to regulate alcohol how their citizens best see fit.

We marked the anniversary of passage of the 21st Amendment with a conversation between Mark Lawrence Schrad Ph.D., author of Smashing the Liquor Machine and Professor of Political Science at Villanova University and Brannon Denning, Center for Alcohol Policy Advisor and Associate Dean and Professor of Law at Samford University’s Cumberland School of Law.

This webinar explored the unique nature of alcohol regulation in the United States and beyond, Prohibition, the 21st Amendment and as well as some of the issues and debates surrounding its consideration and ratification.

These professors discussed Professor Schrad’s fascinating book as well as another book that, like the 21st Amendment, is celebrating its 90th Anniversary, Toward Liquor Control.

Now Accepting Entries for the 2023 National Writing Competition

We are now accepting entries for the 2023 National Writing Competition!

This national academic event is intended to foster debate, analysis, and examination of state alcohol regulation in the 21st Century. Each year, students and professionals are encouraged to participate in this significant effort to bring attention to state alcohol regulation, its complexities and many successes. Up to three winners will be selected, and 1st – 3rd place recipients have a chance to win $5,000, $2,500, or $1,000 respectively.

Massachusetts Alcohol Regulator Receives 11th Annual Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Award

Philadelphia, PA – The Center for Alcohol Policy is pleased to announce it is awarding Frederick “Ted” Mahony, Chief Investigator of the Massachusetts Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission, with its 2023 Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Award.

The Center announced the award, which recognizes a specific program, agency or person who oversees the alcohol industry and promotes public health and safety, at the 16th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference.  

“The Center is proud to present this award to Ted Mahony for providing leadership within the alcohol industry,” said Kelly Roberson, Executive Director of the Center for Alcohol Policy. “Ted is a true public servant who is known as a leader not only in Massachusetts but nationally as well. His development of special enforcement programs continue to be a primer for the industry on methodology to protect public safety and maintain an orderly marketplace.”

Chief Mahony has served as Chief of Investigations and Enforcement with the Massachusetts Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission since 2001. He was named the National Liquor Law Enforcement Association (NLLEA) Agent of the Year for his leadership in ensuring effective liquor law in Massachusetts in 2004 and four years later, the ABCC was recognized as the NLLEA Agency of the Year under his guidance. Ted has dedicated recent years at the commission to addressing both unlicensed interstate and licensed direct-to-consumer alcohol shipments to Massachusetts consumers. 

“Ted never shies away from a difficult task and leans into the hard work by bringing cases with a wide industry impact,” added Roberson. “His dogged determination serves as an example to regulators around the country as to how to strike a balance between public health and safety and responsible growth of the industry.”


8/30/2023

Delaware Attorney General Kathy Jennings to Keynote 2023 ALPC

We are pleased to announce that the Honorable Kathy Jennings will keynote the Center’s 16th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference taking place in Philadelphia, August 28-30, 2023. 

About Attorney General Jennings

A Wilmington native – General Jennings has spent her career working on behalf of the people of Delaware. As the state’s chief legal and law enforcement officer, Jennings demonstrates a focused commitment to “making Delaware a safer place to live and raise our children, making the justice system fair and equal for everyone, and combating the opioid epidemic.”

During her tenure, General Jennings has put her priorities into action, fighting to end mandatory life sentences for drug crimes and restore driving privileges for people with drug convictions to enable them to work. She also helped form the Crime Strategies Unit to closely engage with communities hardest hit by violent crime. Attorney General Jennings’ work experience shows the benefits of state-based policy, and we’re excited to hear more about the critical role this plays in the alcohol industry.


Prior to serving as Delaware’s 46th Attorney General:

  • Prosecutor for the Delaware Department of Justice 
  • Delaware State Prosecutor
  • Chief Deputy Attorney General for the Delaware Department of Justice under Attorney General Charles Oberly
  • Assisted in creating the Consumer Fraud Division
  • Worked in private practice
  • Chief Administrative Officer of New Castle County, Delaware

2023 National Survey Report

Americans Support State Based Alcohol Regulation and See Public Health and Safety as Priorities for Legislators

The Center for Alcohol Policy’s 2023 survey on public sentiment toward alcohol regulation in the U.S. found that attitudes among adult Americans remain the same: the long-standing alcohol regulatory system in the U.S. works, and people like it. There is overwhelming consensus throughout the nation that alcohol is a product that needs to be regulated. This includes similar numbers of Republicans, Democrats, and Independents showing that strong, state-based regulation of alcohol is one of the few issues that Americans of all affiliations agree on.

“Every other year the Center commissions a national survey that takes the temperature of Americans and their opinions regarding a wide variety of topics related to alcohol and its regulation. There are some questions that have been asked for over a decade and others specific to current industry trends. The survey results show that Americans are satisfied with the current alcohol regulatory structure and want to see public health and safety prioritized above all” said Kelly Roberson, Executive Director of the Center for Alcohol Policy.

Center Releases Key Findings from 2023 National Survey

Consensus is Clear: Americans Support State Based Alcohol Regulation and See Public Health and Safety as Priorities for Legislators

Alexandria, VA. – According to a recently released national poll commissioned by the Center for Alcohol Policy, Americans across the political spectrum continue to be satisfied with the state regulation of alcohol. This includes clear and overwhelming satisfaction with the current alcohol regulatory system. Public health and safety also continue to be the top priority when considering any future changes to the alcohol system.

“This year’s survey, as in past years, highlights the consistent sentiment across the nation that responsible alcohol regulation ought to be a priority for policymakers” said Pam Erickson, founder of Healthy Alcohol Marketplace and former executive director of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission. Pam is also a member of the Center for Alcohol Policy’s Advisory Council. “It is my hope that lawmakers and regulators will heed the call of Americans around the nation to prioritize public health and safety over the short-sighted pursuit of increased dollars. Alcohol, as we know, is no ordinary commodity and should be treated accordingly by policymakers and the public alike.”

Key findings include:

  • Solid support exists across party lines for state regulation of alcohol
  • Americans are satisfied with current alcohol regulations
  • Americans want alcohol laws to prioritize safety
  • The three-tier system is viewed as working well by Americans

The survey was conducted by New Bridge Strategy, completing 1001 online interviews with adults aged 21 and older throughout the United States. Interviews were drawn from online panels, and the sample was drawn proportionally throughout the country and is demographically representative of the adult population in this age group. The confidence interval associated with this sample is +/- 3.5% at the 95% confidence level; due to rounding, not all totals will sum to 100%.

 The Center for Alcohol Policy looks forward to continuing to be a resource to educate policymakers, regulators, and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and its regulation.­­­­­

Room Block is Open for ALPC 2023

The room block is officially open for the 16th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference in Philadelphia, PA. The Center is excited to hold our conference at the historic Bellevue Hotel, which is located just steps from City Hall and boasts gorgeous views in the heart of Philadelphia’s Center City.

Center Announces 14th Annual Writing Competition Winner

The Center for Alcohol Policy is pleased to announce that Nathan Sabo, a Medina, Ohio based Research Team Leader, has been named the winner of its 14th Annual Writing Competition.

Sabo graduated from Baldwin University with a Bachelor of Science in Biology, and later pursued a Master of Science in Environmental, Occupational, Health, and Safety from the University of Findlay – all while serving in the Ohio Army National Guard. He now leads a team of technicians to perform study protocol driven functions such as test material administration, blood draws, and data collection. He is also attending courses through Full Sail University for a Bachelor of Science in Video Game Design.

The national writing competition is intended to foster debate, analysis, and examination of alcohol policy in the 21st Century. Last year’s topic addressed the growing ubiquity of alcohol and whether there is a regulatory need to address this potentially concerning trend.

After Prohibition, states generally issued licenses for on-premise and off-premise sale of alcohol.  Drinking was thus largely confined to bars, restaurants, the home, and private clubs.  Alcohol is now regularly offered in places like salons, grocery stores, clothing stores, and galleries.  Is this trend towards ubiquitous availability of alcohol a good one?  And is there a new regulatory regime needed to address this trend?

Sabo’s winning essay, “The Ubiquitous Availability of Alcohol: Freedom Isn’t Free” provides an in-depth analysis on how health and safety should be at the forefront when considering alcohol regulation and availability. Sabo brings in data from various peer reviewed sources, for a concise and thorough discussion on the widespread use of alcohol, finding that many current regimental policies work as intended, but need further enforcement in the name of public health.

“Overall, the more ubiquitous alcohol becomes, the more it increases the density of alcohol outlets, increases consumption of alcohol, and increases alcohol-related problems,” writes Sabo.

Registration is Open!


Registration for the Center for Alcohol Policy’s 16th Annual Alcohol Law and Policy Conference is officially open! The 2023 ALPC will be held Monday, August 28 – Wednesday, August 30, 2023 in Philadelphia, PA at the Bellevue Hotel.

As one of the most valuable conferences on the calendar – and one of the very few with open registration – the Center is proud to offer everyone a seat at the table. From public health and safety advocates to regulators, industry members to legislators – all are welcome, and all are invited to attend our annual flagship conference!

Save the Date:

16th Annual Alcohol Law & Policy Conference

We are planning to hold our 16th Annual Alcohol Law & Policy Conference August 28-30, 2023 in Philadelphia, PA and we can’t wait to see you there!

The conference will be held at the historic Bellevue Hotel in the heart of Philadelphia. Check back soon to register and book your room.

Whitepaper on the Ongoing Battle Over Taxation in the Alcohol Industry

Today the Center for Alcohol Policy released a new whitepaper outlining the battle over taxation in the alcohol industry. The report was commissioned by the Center and authored by Patrick Maroney, President of Maroney Consulting Services, LLC and former Director of the Colorado Department of Revenue’s Liquor Enforcement Division.

“The practice of conducting background checks on liquor license application is a must in order to ensure an orderly and safe marketplace.  Keeping unscrupulous actors out of the alcohol industry is an important role of government entities tasked with regulating alcohol production, distribution and sales,” said report author Patrick Maroney.

Maroney’s report provides an overview of the origin of alcohol taxation, and its primary intent of regulating consumption in addition to funding government entities. Citing Toward Liquor Control, Maroney explores the benefits of different levels of taxation for different alcohol products, striking a balance between availability and overconsumption.

After a historical review of the benefits of targeted alcohol tax regimes, Maroney outlines how in modern times, alcohol excise taxes are falling. He finds it critical that legislators and regulators understand the history of alcohol laws, regulations, and taxation toward the goal of public health and safety, but also recognize there is no silver bullet.

“Even prior to Prohibition, there has been a strong understanding of the need to regulate different types of alcohol differently – including how each product is taxed,” said Brannon Denning, Advisory Council for the Center for Alcohol Policy. Denning is also an Associate Professor of Law at Samford University’s Cumberland School of Law in Birmingham, Alabama. “Taxes represent an important aspect of alcohol regulation, one where there is an understanding that the stronger the beverage there ought to be a corresponding increase in its regulation. However, taxation alone will not solve the public health and safety concerns of the nation and policymakers must utilize a broader chest of regulatory tools to accomplish those goals.”

Whitepaper Explores Ongoing Importance of Alcohol Background Checks

Today the Center for Alcohol Policy released a new whitepaper outlining the timeless need for background checks in the alcohol industry. The report was commissioned by the Center and authored by Patrick Maroney, President of Maroney Consulting Services, LLC and former Director of the Colorado Department of Revenue’s Liquor Enforcement Division. 

“The practice of conducting background checks on liquor license applications is a must in order to ensure an orderly and safe marketplace.  Keeping unscrupulous actors out of the alcohol industry is an important role of government entities tasked with regulating alcohol production, distribution and sales,” said report author Patrick Maroney.

Maroney provides an overview of the origin of background checks in the U.S. beginning in the early 20th Century and their application to the alcohol industry as the nation emerged from Prohibition. Citing Toward Liquor Control, Maroney points to background checks as an essential component in achieving the goal of safe and responsible consumption through the elimination of crime. 

Maroney’s report also explores the relevance of background checks to today’s alcohol regulatory environment. Objectives of background checks include: 

  • Keeping criminal elements out of the industry 
  • Preserving the government’s ability to collect tax revenue 
  • Preventing cross-tier ownership and vertical integration of the industry 
  • Ensuring compliance with laws designed to moderate the overstimulation of alcohol sales 

“Conducting background checks is a valuable and important safeguard across many industries and the alcohol industry, in particular, is no exception to that rule,” said Jerry Oliver, Advisory Council for the Center for Alcohol Policy. Oliver is also the former Detroit Chief of Police and Director of the Arizona Department of Liquor License and Control. “As we know, alcohol is no ordinary commodity, and as such, those involved in the industry ought to undergo rigorous scrutiny to ensure public health and safety are protected and criminal elements are kept out of the marketplace.” 

The Center for Alcohol Policy looks forward to continuing to be a resource and to educate policymakers, regulators, and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and its regulation.

Holiday Safety Webinar Round Up

On Tuesday, November 15th, the Center for Alcohol Policy along with J.T. Griffin of Griffin Strategies, kicked off our Holiday Safety Campaign with a webinar.

We brought in a team of experts with experience in saving lives to look upstream at what it takes to keep people safe around the holidays.

Panelists Included:

  • Kelly Roberson, Executive Director, Center for Alcohol Policy
  • J.T. Griffin, Principal, Griffin Strategies
  • Stephanie Shaw, Office of Safety Recommendations and Communications Safe Systems, NTSB
  • Kurt Erickson, President, The Washington Regional Alcohol Program (WRAP) 
  • Tim Poulin, Deputy Director, Maine’s Bureau of Alcoholic Beverages and Lottery Operations 

Three Key Takeaways from our webinar include:

  • Convincing people to separate drinking from driving. There needs to be as much intervention as possible, enlisting unique partnerships to carry it out.
  • All drunk driving incidents are 100% preventable. In the same vein, seatbelts are the safest line of defense during any type of traffic incident.
  • State regulators need more support from policymakers dedicated to compliance and enforcement of liquor laws.

You can find the webinar below:

 Click HERE to read a summary of our 2022 webinar series.

2022 Holiday Safety Campaign Kickoff

This holiday season, the Center is pleased to continue our efforts to support safe consumption of alcohol with the launch of a new Holiday Safety Campaign.  We are partnering with members of organizations like the National Liquor Law Enforcement Association and the National Alcohol Beverage Control Association, and the Washington Regional Alcohol Program to remind people to have a safe and happy holiday season. 

Alcohol is a unique product and is regulated differently from other goods.  Strong regulations are important to maintain public safety.  A poll released by the Center found that 87% of Americans believe the American alcohol industry needs to be regulated.  At the Center, we educate policymakers, regulators, and the public on the reasons why alcohol is different. 

As we get ready to celebrate Thanksgiving, the Center wanted to thank law enforcement for their efforts to keep us safe as we travel during one of the busiest times of the year.  Travel and Leisure Magazine reports an estimated 69% of Americans will travel by road during the holidays in 2022.

The roads are especially dangerous this year.  The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration tracks annual fatalities and from 2019 to 2021, estimates show that traffic deaths increased by 18%!

This past summer, we hosted a webinar series focused on issues that alcohol can impact.  Specifically, we did a deep dive on traffic safety and law enforcement.  Our speakers looked at both upstream and downstream solutions for safety including historical trends, what has been effective in the past, and what needs to occur in the future.  If you didn’t get a chance to attend, we encourage you to view the recorded sessions as there is a lot of good content. 

One thing we learned is that law enforcement is under tremendous pressure as they navigate new challenges.  A report we issued last year, The History of Drunk Driving, found that in 2020, police retirements were up 45 percent, resignations up 18%, and a 5% decrease in new hires.  This, coupled with broader society challenges, meant DUI arrests were down while DUI deaths and injuries increased.     

In addition to challenges in traffic enforcement, changes to alcohol laws and sales practices are adding making law enforcement’s job more complex.  The pandemic sent state legislators across the country scurrying to keep local businesses afloat.  In the alcohol industry, “cocktails to go” became a popular way for bars and restaurants to keep sales going when carryout was the only option. 

But did states react too quickly?  The Center published an essay by Patrick Maroney, “Crisis De-Regulations” Should They Stay or Should They Go?, where he describes the rush to make these new alcohol laws permanent.  His recommendation?  “Festina Lente,” which means “make haste slowly.” 

Maroney argues that while Covid 19 did create a crisis for businesses and sales, states need to be thoughtful when making permanent changes to alcohol sales.  His essay shows that the three-tiered alcohol sales system is a “proven regulatory system that monitors…sales and compliance with liquor laws.”

Cocktails to go and alcohol delivery services have raised serious safety concerns.  Another report issued by the Center, Open Container Laws and Alcohol-To-Go, examined the impact of relaxing alcohol sales on drinking and driving.  Will these laws make it easier for underage drinkers to purchase alcohol? 

During our traffic safety webinar, we heard from Matt Stemple who shared videos of underage people using popular alcohol delivery services to illegally purchase alcohol in North Carolina.  In some cases, delivery drivers failed to check for IDs and in one instance, a driver warned that she was going to get in trouble for allowing the sale of the alcohol when the purchaser was clearly underage.  

While there have been changes to alcohol laws over the last two years, we know that the U.S. continues to have one of the safest alcohol sales systems in the world.  State-based alcohol regulation in conjunction with a three-tier system is critical to ensuring public health and safety.  We also know that Americans support the system.  A 2021 national survey commissioned by the Center found that 83% of Americans want states to regulate alcohol through the three-tiered system.

The Center looks forward to continuing to share our work to keep alcohol and the public safety and again thank our partners for joining us this holiday season. 

Center for Alcohol Policy Announces Holiday Safety Campaign

This year the Center for Alcohol Policy is pleased to announce our Holiday Safety Campaign!   

Thanksgiving through New Year’s is a time when many gather with friends and family to celebrate the holiday season.  Many celebrations can involve alcohol, so the Center wanted to highlight some of the work we have done over the year as well as share some of the great work of our partners.   

To kick off the 2022 campaign, we will host a webinar on: 

November 15th at 1:00PM Eastern

Register HERE    

We’re going to look both upstream and downstream at solutions for safety during, and beyond, the holiday season and have an exciting lineup of speakers including: 

Stephanie Shaw, NTSB, Office of Safety Recommendations and Communications safe systems The NTSB has made eliminating drunk driving a part of its annual Most Wanted List of safety improvements for some time.  Stephanie will talk about the National Transportation Safety Board’s recommendations on Place of Last Drink laws and how these fit into the Safe Systems approach to traffic safety.   

Kurt Erickson, President of the Washington Regional Alcohol Program (WRAP) 

Each year WRAP sponsors the award-winning Sober Ride program in the Washington Metro Area.  The program is called one of the nation’s most successful free safe ride programs for would-be impaired drivers.  Since 1991, WRAP has provided 80,047 safe rides home. Currently, SoberRide®?operates during the December/January holiday season, St. Patrick’s Day, Cinco de Mayo, Independence Day and Halloween. 

Tim Poulin, Deputy Director, Maine’s Bureau of Alcoholic Beverages and Lottery Operations 

In August, the Center hosted a Law Enforcement Webinar to highlight the challenges facing enforcement and how that impacts alcohol sales and regulations.  Tim will share his experiences in Maine.  

The Webinar is hosted by Kelly Roberson, Executive Director of the Center for Alcohol Policy, and moderated by J.T. Griffin, Principal at Griffin Strategies.   

Law Enforcement Webinar Roundup

On Wednesday, August 10th, the Center, in conjunction with J.T. Griffin of Griffin Strategies, hosted a webinar focused on alcohol laws and both traditional and alcohol law enforcement.

Featuring a fantastic group of experts, our panelists pulled from their years of experience in a conversation about nuances in law enforcement, recent trends based on social pressure, the power of budgets, need for input from all stakeholders, and much more.

Panelists Included:

  • Kelly Roberson, Executive Director, Center for Alcohol Policy
  • J.T. Griffin, Principal, Griffin Strategies
  • Jerry Oliver, Center for Alcohol Policy Advisor, Former Chief of Police, Former Director of the Arizona Department of Liquor License and Control
  • Dottie Taylor, Missouri Alcohol & Tobacco Control
  • Mike Brown, Former Chief of Police, Alexandria, VA
  • Matthew Botting, California Alcoholic Beverage Control

Three Key Takeaways from our Webinar Include:

  • Law Enforcement – both traditional and alcohol law enforcement – is under tremendous pressure in the wake of ongoing budget shortcomings, social issues, and COVID.
  • State and local enforcement budgets have been severely impacted causing a big shift in how enforcement occurs, impacting traffic safety and enforcement of alcohol laws.
  • Changing alcohol laws need to be approached in a thoughtful manner considering the far-reaching impacts and various stakeholders – public health in particular

You can find the Webinar below:

Click HERE to read a summary of our 2022 webinar series.

Center for Alcohol Policy Holds 15th Annual Alcohol Law & Policy Conference

Nashville, TN – The Center for Alcohol Policy held its 15th annual Alcohol Law & Policy Conference August 30-31st,  featuring record attendance. The conference brought together regulators, public health advocates, law enforcement and cultural leaders to discuss current and future trends and issues impacting the alcohol industry. 

“The alcohol industry faces many critical and constantly evolving priorities.  From current litigation and issues like direct-to-consumer shipping and trade practices, to the effects of alcohol on public health and safety, alcohol law and policy play an important role in today’s society. This conference provides a valuable opportunity for parties across the alcohol sector to discuss and debate these issues, connect and learn from one another,” said Kelly Roberson, Executive Director of the Center for Alcohol Policy. “I want to thank all our speakers and attendees for providing for a robust discussion with the highest attendance yet for this conference.”

In his keynote address, Georgia Attorney General Chris Carr discussed some of the top priorities for his office, including consumer protection, prosecuting fraud and corruption, and addressing cyber fraud. He stressed his commitment to a state-based alcohol regulation, as well as the importance of maintaining a stable and reliable legal and regulatory environment in general. Businesses should have clear laws and regulations on which they can rely. He thanked the Center for Alcohol Policy for its partnership and important work to advance alcohol policy.

Carr also discussed his focus on the fight against human trafficking and thanked beer distributors for their partnership on this critical issue through the Distributors Against Human Trafficking Initiative. This initiative gives beer distribution employees the training and resources necessary to recognize and report the signs of human trafficking.  

In addition, attendees heard panel discussions on the 21st Amendment and current alcohol litigation, got an update from federal and state regulators, and heard discussions on how alcohol law and regulation affects public health and safety, in particular traffic safety. Discussions also centered around current hot topics in alcohol regulation, such as direct-to-consumer shipping, drinks to go and new entrants into the marketplace.  Participants also heard a conversation about some of the cultural impacts of alcohol and how it has impacted music and culture over the course of the 20th century.

As part of the conference, the Center presented its 2022 Leadership in Alcohol Regulation Awards to Becky Schlauch, Administrator of the Montana Department of Revenue’s Liquor Control Division, and Thomas Graham, Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission Executive Director.


9/1/2022


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Center for Alcohol Policy
277 S. Washington Street Suite 500-A Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: (703) 519-3090 info@centerforalcoholpolicy.org