Deadline Extended for Center for Alcohol Policy National Essay Contest

December 6th 2016, 10:09am

ALEXANDRIA, VA – The deadline to enter the Center for Alcohol Policy’s Ninth Annual Essay Contest has been extended. The Center will accept entries through December 16, 2016. The topic for this year’s contest is:

The 21st Amendment repealed Prohibition and put control over alcohol regulation directly in the hands of the states. Though each state’s alcohol control policies are unique, they all include distinct regulations for different types of alcohol. Why are various types of alcohol regulated in different ways? Should they be?

“The Center’s essay contest is intended to foster debate, analysis and examination of state alcohol regulation and its implications for citizens across the United States,” said Center for Alcohol Policy Advisory Council member and Samford University Cumberland School of Law Professor Brannon Denning.

“We can learn a lot from our nation’s history with alcohol, especially looking at the societal problems that led to national Prohibition and the public policy initiatives that were put in place following the passage of the 21st Amendment, which repealed Prohibition and began today’s system of state-based alcohol regulation,” Denning said.

WHO CAN ENTER: The contest is open to all persons who are over the age of 18 as of December 2016. Students, academics, practicing attorneys, policymakers and members of the general public are encouraged to submit essays.

HOW TO ENTER: Essays may be emailed to essay@centerforalcoholpolicy.org or mailed as a hard copy to: Center for Alcohol Policy; Attn: Essay Contest; 1101 King St., Suite 600-A; Alexandria, VA, 22314. Essays must be accompanied by an entry form.

DEADLINE: The new deadline for entries is December 16, 2016. Winners will be announced in early 2017.

AWARDS: Cash prizes will be awarded to the first, second and third place winners in the amounts of $2,500, $1,250 and $500 respectively.

To read essay guidelines and last year’s winning essays, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org/essay-contest. For more information, please call (703) 519-3090.

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501(c)(3) organization whose mission is to educate policymakers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

 

 

Center for Alcohol Policy Marks Anniversary of 21st Amendment

December 5th 2016, 9:58am

21st Amendment Repealed Prohibition and Launched Today’s State-Based Alcohol System

ALEXANDRIA, VA – On Monday, December 5, the Center for Alcohol Policy is commemorating the 83rd anniversary of the ratification of the 21st Amendment to the United States Constitution. On that date in 1933, Prohibition ended in the United States when 36 states (the requisite three-fourths majority of the then 48 states) ratified the 21st Amendment to the United States Constitution, thereby repealing the 18th Amendment which began Prohibition in 1920.

For more than 80 years, the United States and its citizens have benefited from a state-based system of alcohol regulation, established following ratification of the 21st Amendment, which gives each state the primary authority to enact and enforce alcohol laws consistent with the desires and needs of its citizens.

“The repeal of the failed, one-size-fits-all policy of national Prohibition was not the end of the story – it’s where the story of today’s successful system began,” said Mike Lashbrook, executive director for the Center. “The 21st Amendment recognized that alcohol is a unique product that is best controlled by individual states, and it provided a solution that continues to be effective today.”

“In 1933, the country decided to regulate a formerly banned product and wisely chose to put the states in the lead, but at the same time gave them constitutional protections for whatever approach they chose,” Lashbrook continued. “Ideas suggested by Toward Liquor Control helped shape some of those specific policy choices. As the country considers whether to regulate a banned product like marijuana, the lessons from the 21st Amendment are more important than ever.”

Lashbrook added, “The state-based system of alcohol regulation has been extremely effective at supporting a competitive marketplace while at the same time promoting public safety. America does not experience large problems with bootlegging, counterfeit products or a black market, which were common during national Prohibition and have proven deadly in other parts of the world that lack an effective regulatory system for alcohol.”

A report by former Chief Counsel for the United States Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau Robert M. Tobiassen, “The ‘Fake Alcohol’ Situation in the United States: The Impact of Culture, Market Economics, and the Current Regulatory Systems,” explains why there are few incidents of fake alcohol products in the United States. The study describes “strong regulatory systems that police the production, importation, distribution and retail sales of alcohol beverages through independent parties” and the country’s “competitive marketplace that provides alcohol beverages at all price points.”

Visit the Center for Alcohol Policy website to watch a video about the origin of America’s state-based alcohol regulatory system and to learn about the Center’s republication of Toward Liquor Control, written in 1933 to help guide alcohol policy in the states post-Prohibition. The website also features national polling research on Americans attitudes toward alcohol regulation and a guide to the basics of alcohol beverage control for new state alcohol regulators.

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501 (c)(3) organization whose mission is to educate policymakers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

 

 

 

 

 

Deadline Approaches for Center for Alcohol Policy National Essay Contest

November 2nd 2016, 9:40am

ALEXANDRIA, VA – One month remains to enter the Center for Alcohol Policy’s Ninth Annual Essay Contest. The Center will accept entries through December 2, 2016. The topic for this year’s contest is:

The 21st Amendment repealed Prohibition and put control over alcohol regulation directly in the hands of the states. Though each state’s alcohol control policies are unique, they all include distinct regulations for different types of alcohol. Why are various types of alcohol regulated in different ways? Should they be?

“The Center’s essay contest is intended to foster debate, analysis and examination of state alcohol regulation and its implications for citizens across the United States,” said Center for Alcohol Policy Advisory Council member and Samford University Cumberland School of Law Professor Brannon Denning.

“We can learn a lot from our nation’s history with alcohol, especially looking at the societal problems that led to national Prohibition and the public policy initiatives that were put in place following the passage of the 21st Amendment, which repealed Prohibition and began today’s system of state-based alcohol regulation,” Denning said.

WHO CAN ENTER: The contest is open to all persons who are over the age of 18 as of December 2016. Students, academics, practicing attorneys, policymakers and members of the general public are encouraged to submit essays.

HOW TO ENTER: Essays may be emailed to essay@centerforalcoholpolicy.org or mailed as a hard copy to: Center for Alcohol Policy; Attn: Essay Contest; 1101 King St., Suite 600-A; Alexandria, VA, 22314. Essays must be accompanied by an entry form.

DEADLINE: The deadline for entries is December 2, 2016. Winners will be announced in early 2017.

AWARDS: Cash prizes will be awarded to the first, second and third place winners in the amounts of $2,500, $1,250 and $500 respectively.

To read essay guidelines and last year’s winning essays, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org/essay-contest. For more information, please call (703) 519-3090.

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501(c)(3) organization whose mission is to educate policymakers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

 

 

 

 

Center for Alcohol Policy Marks Constitution Day

September 15th 2016, 9:57am

Educational Resources Highlight 21st Amendment as Origin of America’s State-Based Regulatory System

ALEXANDRIA, VA – This Constitution Day, celebrated annually on September 17, the Center for Alcohol Policy is highlighting its educational resources that explain the 21st Amendment’s role in establishing America’s state-based regulatory system.

The Center for Alcohol Policy video The Origins of America’s State-Based Regulatory System illustrates the origin of today’s alcohol regulatory system, which works to balance alcohol control with an orderly and competitive marketplace.

The video features Center for Alcohol Policy advisors Brannon Denning, professor at Samford University’s Cumberland School of Law, and Jerry Oliver, Sr., former Arizona alcohol regulator and chief of police for Detroit, Richmond and Pasadena.

“The 21st Amendment was important because not only did it repeal Prohibition but it also returned control over alcohol policy where it belongs, to state and local governments who can determine what kinds of policies serve the needs of their citizens best,” Denning said.

The video describes the Center’s republication of the book Toward Liquor Control, which outlined how states should regulate the sale and serving of alcohol following the repeal of Prohibition, and how the book is still helping shape policy today.

“It gives the tenets for why alcohol should be controlled at the local level, why states and local jurisdiction are to have the final say as to how alcohol is accessed and how it’s distributed,” said Oliver.

“It’s clear that what’s acceptable in Nevada isn’t necessarily acceptable in Utah,” added Denning. “The 21st Amendment and the flexibility of state-based regulation allows those local differences to be taken into account.”

Another educational resource that explains the 21st Amendment’s role in establishing America’s state-based alcohol regulatory system and offers tips for those charged with enforcing state laws today is the brief guide, “Alcohol Beverage Control: The Basics for New State Alcohol Regulators,” written by former alcohol regulator Roger B. Johnson, a 38-year veteran of the Alcohol & Tobacco Enforcement Unit of the Wisconsin Department of Revenue, and published by the Center.

The Center also supported the development of a “Toast the Constitution!” lesson plan. Through a partnership with the Bill of Rights Institute, this resource helps educators teach students about the origins of the 18th Amendment, the individuals and groups who fought for and against Prohibition, and the events that led to its repeal with the passage of the 21st Amendment.

To learn more about the Center for Alcohol Policy and its programs, please visit www.centerforalcholpolicy.org.

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The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501 c (3) organization whose mission is to educate policy makers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation.  By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption.  For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

Enforcement Emphasized at National Alcohol Law and Policy Conference

September 1st 2016, 3:46pm

Underage Drinking, Prevention Efforts and Trade Practices Also Highlighted

 DALLAS, TX – Enforcement of alcohol regulations and policies was a recurring theme during the Center for Alcohol Policy’s Ninth Annual Law and Policy Conference held at the Renaissance Dallas Hotel August 28 – 30 in Dallas, Texas. The conference brought together a diverse group of state and federal alcohol regulators, law enforcement, legislators, public health advocates and alcohol beverage industry representatives to review trends in the field of alcohol regulation and learn from best practices around the country.

Jim Hall, Center for Alcohol Policy advisor and former National Transportation Safety Board chairman, welcomed attendees and summarized the objectives of the conference saying, “Look around the room. There are regulators, legislators, federal health officials, public health interest groups, trade groups, law enforcement and industry members. We may not always agree on policy, but the fact that we are all under one roof having a civil debate is an accomplishment not only for the Center for Alcohol Policy but also for your leadership in your respective fields.”

The conference began with a presentation by staff of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the lead federal agency charged with coordinating the federal response to underage drinking. SAMHSA Chief of Staff Tom Coderre and Public Health Analyst Rob Vincent reviewed data, trends and prevention strategies to address this important public health priority. While progress has been made in this fight, especially with regard to episodic drinking by 12-17 year olds, the SAMHSA officials pointed out that progress seems to have stalled with the 18-20 age group.

During the question and answer portion of the session “Legislators and Regulators Working Together,” Jerry Oliver, a member of the Center’s Advisory Council and former regulator and chief of police, made a passionate plea to a panel of state regulators and legislators to provide the resources to properly staff and enforce the licensing and trade practice regulations that are so important to protect public safety. Oliver cited the past trends of budget cuts and staff reductions in alcohol regulatory agencies that have created a situation where a mere handful of alcohol enforcement agents are responsible for overseeing an entire state area and tens of thousands of licensees.

During the session “Trade Practices in the Headlines,” Shawn Walker, deputy chief for the Bureau of Law Enforcement of the Virginia Department of Alcohol Beverage Control, reviewed his agency’s recent efforts to increase trade practice enforcement in their state. Rather than a few well-publicized stings for those breaking trade practice rules, the Virginia initiative starts with an educational effort with all three tiers of the industry to review the market practice rules and notify the industry that the agency’s special investigations unit will soon begin a much more aggressive approach to enforcement of these important regulations. The goal is to achieve voluntary compliance through education.

The session “The Need for Greater Expertise in Alcohol Litigation” provided an annual update on alcohol litigation. Other important topics covered at the conference included intellectual property and alcohol law, international trade and alcohol and issues in private label alcohol.

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 The Center for Alcohol Policy is a 501c(3) organization whose mission is to educate policy makers, regulators and the public about alcohol, its uniqueness and regulation. By conducting sound and scientific-based research and implementing initiatives that will maintain the appropriate state-based regulation of alcohol, the Center promotes safe and responsible consumption, fights underage drinking and drunk driving and informs key entities about the effects of alcohol consumption. For more information, visit www.centerforalcoholpolicy.org or follow the Center on Twitter at www.twitter.com/AlcoholPolicy.

 

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Center for Alcohol Policy
1101 King Street Ste 600-A Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: (703) 519-3090 info@centerforalcoholpolicy.org